Canada Teen Surveys

Canada Teen Surveys

Under 18? No problem! You too can make money taking online surveys. The following online survey companies accept Canadian panelists under the age of 18.

Register with each company to increase your chances of being invited to take online surveys, and check your e-mail inbox! You will be told in the e-mail how much cash you will make if you take the survey, and once you take it, you can expect to receive your reward shortly.

My Survey
Earn cash paid to your PayPal account. Low $10 payout minimum
Minimum age to join: 16 years old
Earn cash paid to your Dwolla or PayPal account. $10 cashout minimum.
Minimum age to join: 13 years old
Earn cash paid by PayPal or cheque for taking surveys. Get gift cards if you wish.
Minimum age to join: 14 years old
Each points you can exchange for dozens of gift cards, PayPal payments and more.
Minimum age to join: 13 years old
Web Perspectives
Each points for your choice of gift cards, Air Miles, or donations to charity.
Minimum age to join: 14 years old
Earn cash for each survey completed, get paid via cheque
Minimum age to join: 14 years old

Online surveys serve as a vast advantage to marketing groups. Before the advent of the internet, researchers had to go to extensive lengths in order to gather the information that they needed to sell a product. However, in today’s times, it is remarkably easy to collect information through online surveys; in fact, many people participate in these surveys simply because they find the process to be fun and enjoyable. Teens are no exception to this rule, and many research companies are encountered with numerous teen survey panelist applicants on a regular basis.

Why Are Teen Surveys Popular Amongst Canadian Youth?

Surveys hold a universal appeal for all of their participants: they allow your voice to be heard. All members of society, both young and old, want to feel that their opinions are important in a broad context.

Teens are especially attracted to this prospect. When they are feeling frustrated or angry about their current place in the world, teens are able to find relief in the form of surveys, which reassure them that their ideas do matter on a large scale. For this reason, many teens consistently take surveys regarding their personal preferences, ideas, and moral concerns.

Many teens are also enticed by the rewards that are promised for the completion of certain surveys. Some programs offer cash, prizes, or even music downloads.

Is the Collection of Information from Teens Legal?

Despite many teens’ willingness to participate in surveys, many Canadian companies refuse to accept youth questionnaire submissions. This bewilders and frustrates many prospective panelists.

Canadian companies oftentimes refrain from accepting teen surveys simply due to law constraints. It is actually perfectly legal for companies to collect information from minors – the COPPA (Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act) is applicable only to youth under the age of thirteen. However, certain restrictions are still in place that make the collection of teen data somewhat difficult.

Teens are considered minors under the law. Therefore, if a court should rule that a teen has been unfairly taken advantage of as a result of his or her age, the company that gathered data from the teen could be severely punished. The fact that teens are not protected under COPPA is irrelevant in this sense. Although companies are permitted more freedom in the collection of information from teens (for instance, parental permission is not required for teens to submit survey data), they can still be punished if the data is used improperly.

Some organizations persist in gathering such information out of necessity. Marketers still need to know about the trends that are sweeping modern teenagers so that certain products can be sold accordingly. Therefore, in order to utilize Canada teen surveys, Canadian companies simply take certain precautions that ensure the information they gather cannot be construed as unlawful. Parental permission is usually required for teen participants so that legal guardians cannot sue the company for their children’s rights. Additionally, many survey companies choose to operate in government-approved programs through school districts and extracurricular activities.

What You Can Do As a Parent

If you’re a parent interested in having your teen complete surveys, you can give them the permission they might need in order to join a panel. Some panels will ask for a parent’s permission via e-mail or telephone call to confirm a teen’s membership. If your teen has gone ahead and joined a panel themselves, you might be contacted by the market research company. If you have any privacy concerns or any other questions for the panel, now would be the time to ask them directly.

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